• The Rise and Subsequent Downward Slide of the Middle Class in the United States Since 1938

    by John M Repp An economic historian looking at the USA over the past 70 years would be alarmed, assuming they wanted the American people to be healthy and happy. The two charts below tell much of the story. In the first chart, the minimum wage kept pace with the rise in productivity from 1938 to 1968 as the left-hand half of the chart shows. That was the period when the great American middle-class came on the stage of history. After 1968 the productivity curve climbed ever higher but the minimum wage and the general wage level stagnated. This means there was a great increase in wealth creation, but the wage earners, which was most of the American population, were…

  • September 2021 Newsletter print edition

    The latest print version of Pacific Call is now available as a pdf to view or download. See the latest articles including the ones posted since our last newsletter issue, plus some enlightning tidbits! Click here Full URL is https://wwfor.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/PacificCall0921.pdf

  • Afghanistan : Notes from the Editor (Larry Kershner)

    Reposting, written November 8, 2011, after a month in Afghanistan, midway through the 20 years of US. occupation and war in Afghanistan. This is the last entry from the journal of our recent trip to Afghanistan.  I now realize how little I have known and still know about Afghanistan and the people who live here.  Afghanistan appears to me to be teetering on the brink of collapse despite “the light at the end of the tunnel” talk by the militarist machine.  Three and a half billion people on the globe live on less than $2.50 a day- most of the people of Afghanistan among them.  Many people here express the desire that the apparent stability maintained by the military presence…

  • The Braver Angels Workshop: July 17, 2021

    by David Lambert It was just a few minutes into the recent WWFOR sponsored Braver Angels workshop held virtually this past July, that I realized I had not been chosen as a participant in work/sharing groups. Instead, observing this workshop proved to be an enlightening and rewarding experience for me. I had earlier this year participated in another three-hour Braver Angels workshop with the identical title: Depolarizing Within. This previous experience with the workshop content assisted me in my observer role; a role I perceive the Braver Angels staff wanted me to be in. Following my short welcome, Dee Edelman, the principal Braver Angel Moderator, mentioned that this workshop was geared to help members and supporters of WWFOR and other…

  • Western Washington FOR Youth Program: Gathers Strength Online

    by Bruce Pruitt-Hamm, reprinted from Fellowship, summer 2021 (the national FOR magazine) …our elders have lots of wisdom and experience to share with us, and to make changes to the world, our movements must be intergenerational. … But young people? We are yet to be broken and burned out. We are still closer than adults to that part of ourselves that is full of questions, challenges, and a refusal to accept the state of the world around us. We have fresh energy, insight, and a unique power to create change in our world. Jamie Margolin, 2017 Mike Yarrow Peace FellowYouth to Power, p. xiv. Hachette Books. Kindle Edition (2020) The Mike Yarrow Peace Fellowship is a unique long-term training program…

  • Ranked-Choice Voting Won in New York and is on its Way in Washington

    An article by Stoney Bird, explains how ranked-choice voting works, gives us some history, and explains how this is a tool for a more democratic way of choosing our elected officials. Ranked-Choice Voting Won in New York and is on its Way in Washington by Stoney Bird And not just ranked-choice voting (RCV). The voters won, too. New York City just conducted the biggest ranked-choice voting election ever in the U.S. The bumble of the test ballots grabbed headlines – but that had nothing to do with RCV. That was just human error (darned humans!) from the election officials – and it was promptly corrected. As far as RCV goes, the election was a huge success. We know this thanks…

  • Making War Obsolete

    by John M Repp We should have abolished war after World War II. That war was so lethal and so destructive, even before the dropping of the atomic bombs, that had people understood that there is a real alternative to deadly violent conflict, humanity might have taken another path. Instead, we took the path of nuclear deterrence which is a desperate and bankrupt policy that endangers our very existence. Why have we not abolished war? Gene Sharp (now deceased) of the Albert Einstein Institute says it is because people see a need to defend themselves from foreign occupations, coup d’états and/or dictatorial regimes, and we do not know there is another way. The mythology of conventional history as told by…

  • Why North Dakota Wheat Farmers Needed a Public Bank – and Why We Do, Too

    by Stoney Bird North Dakota wheat farmers had had it. Mill owners, grain elevator operators, and railroads, mostly based in Minneapolis, had them at their mercy and their own state government, whether under the Democrats or Republicans, was not stepping up. So, the farmers took the bit in their teeth. They formed something called the Nonpartisan League. The League took North Dakota – and many neighboring states and Canadian provinces – by storm. To get the word out the League sent out organizers who were paid commissions each time they signed up a new member of the League and who were issued the newest thing in communications gear – a Model T Ford – so that they could traverse the…

  • Prohibiting First Use of Nuclear Weapons

    A letter to the Editor of the Seattle Times, written by Louise Lansberry, sent the week after April 22, 2021: Dear Editor, Last week, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 21-1 (There are 12 Democrats and 10 Republicans on the committee) in support of the Strategic Competition Act of 2021.  It appears that the desire to support a very hostile position toward China is a bi-partisan affair.  All the old issues are repeated:  human rights abuses, absence of democratic institutions, unfair trade practices, stealing of intellectual property are among the complaints. As if the United States has an unblemished record on any of these matters.  The danger, as Henry Kissinger pointed out at a recent conference, is the doomsday potential…